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समर्थक

मंगलवार, 7 जनवरी 2014

आरोग्य प्रहरी

आरोग्य प्रहरी 

(१) दमे की रोकथाम में चाबी खाद्य रेशों के हाथ में हो सकती है। चूहों पर किये गए एक अभिनव अध्ययन से पता चला है ,खाद्य  रेशे (dietary fibre )आंत्र क्षेत्र में सूक्ष्म जीवाणु दल के संतुलन को असर ग्रस्त करते हैं नतीज़न या तो श्वशन मार्ग पहले से ज्यादा अरक्षित भी हो सकता है कम  भी।

(२) एंटीडिप्रेसेंट्स (अवसाद रोधी दवाओं )के यौन व्यवहार पर पड़ने वाले अवांछित प्रभावों को नियमित व्यायाम बे -असर कर सकता है।  

(३) एक अमरीकी अध्ययन से इल्म हुआ है हम लोग  सोने के दरमियान ज्यादा केलोरी खर्च कर लेते हैं बरक्स टेलीविजन देखने के दौरान खर्च की गई कैलोरीज़ के। 

सेहतनामा 

मोटापे को शिकस्त देने की खातिर स्वास्थ्यरिसर्चदानों ने एक खाद्य  जेल तैयार किया है। यह दो खादय पदार्थों का मिश्र है जो आमाशय तेज़ाब से संयुक्त होकर फूल जाता है और देर तक पेट भरा होने का एहसास करवाता है। 

(४ )छोटी इलायची (Cardamom )भूख खोलती है ,खट्टापन अथवा अम्लता को कम करती है। 

(५ )रूई के फाये पर थोड़ा सा एक दो बूँद भर लॉन्ग का तेल लेकर दर्द करते दांत /मसूड़ों /gums पर टपकाने से दर्द की उग्रता थोड़ी कम होती है हालाकि ये आराम अल्पकालिक ही सिद्ध होता है समाधान दंत चिकित्सक के पास ही रहता है। 

(६ )Treating chronic kidney disease using clay minerals


Clay has healing powers. This natural product is destined to help treat chronic kidney disease: a well-tolerated agent based on clay minerals lowers patients’ excessive phosphate levels.


Miss M. spends around 15 hours a week in hospital. Her renal functions are limited, and her kidneys are no longer able to filter toxins from her blood. She is a dialysis patient, forced to rely on this artificial blood purification treatment that, although essential, greatly impairs her quality of life. She has to make three trips a week to the dialysis clinic and going away for longer than a few days is almost out of the question. And Miss M. is no exception: In Germany alone, over six million people suffer from some form of chronic renal disease. Around 70,000 depend on dialysis and they are joined by some 15,000 new dialysis patients every year. Poor diet and an aging population are contributing to the dramatic rise in chronic renal disease worldwide, with high blood pressure and diabetes the most significant risk factors related to renal failure.


When suffering from renal failure, the body is unable to filter out phosphates in sufficient quantities, and the resulting excess is then absorbed into the blood. This causes a build-up of calcium-phosphate deposits in the blood vessels, which can over an extended period lead to arteriosclerotic heart disease and premature death. Compared to people with healthy kidneys, those with compromised renal function are at least ten times more likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke. To counteract this increased risk, people suffering from chronic renal insufficiency are required to take phosphate binders with meals. In the stomach and intestines, these medications bind to phosphates from food so that they can be excreted undigested instead of being absorbed into the blood. The problem is that existing medications, such as calcium and aluminum salts, cause serious side-effects including constipation, hypercalcemia (an elevated level of calcium in the blood), and neurologic disorders.


Gentle alternatives to pharmaceutical treatments

But hope is in sight for sufferers of chronic renal disease. Scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology IZI in Rostock teamed up with FIM Biotech GmbH to develop an effective therapeutic agent that patients can tolerate well. Formed by marine deposits of volcanic ash 60 billion years ago, clay minerals found in the Friedland area of north-east Germany provide the basis for the new agent. The clay first has to be processed before being refined using a special technical process.

In a series of laboratory trials and cell culture experiments, the cooperation partners were able to prove the high phosphate-binding capacity and tolerance rate of the clay minerals. “The phosphate binder obtained from pure mineralogical raw materials is just as effective as traditional pharmaceutical binders. It can lower renal patients’ elevated phosphate levels. Our tests using animal models show that, unlike standard medications, our binder causes only mild side-effects,” says Prof. Dr. Steffen Mitzner, head of the Working Group on Extracorporeal Immunomodulation in Rostock and Professor of Nephrology at the city’s university. The scientists believe that their refined natural raw material could also be used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Another animal model trial is currently underway to determine the scope of using clay minerals to help heal artificially induced bowel inflammation.

The Fraunhofer scientists and FIM Biotech GmbH have filed a patent application for their agent and refining technique. The animal trials are scheduled for completion by the end of 2013, and the scientists expect to be able to start passing on the benefits of the new agent to the first patients when clinical trials begin in early 2014.


Treat chronic kidney disease with clay?



 
Based on naturally occurring Friedländer clay, shown here in its raw state: A new agent in the treatment of chronic kidney disease.
© FIM Biotech GmbH

German researchers have found that clay minerals could be used to treat chronic kidney disease and bowel inflammation as it lowers excessive phosphate levels



Poor diet and an aging population are contributing to the dramatic rise in chronic renal disease worldwide, with high blood pressure and diabetes the most significant risk factors related to renal failure. When suffering from renal failure, the body is unable to filter out phosphates in sufficient quantities, and the resulting excess is then absorbed into the blood. 

This causes a build-up of calciumphosphate deposits in the blood vessels, which can over an extended period lead to arteriosclerotic heart disease and premature death. Compared to people with healthy kidneys, those with compromised renal function are at least ten times more likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke.

To counteract this increased risk, people suffering from chronic renal insufficiency are required to take phosphate binders with meals. In the stomach and intestines, these medications bind to phosphates from food so that they can be excreted undigested instead of being absorbed into the blood. The problem is that existing medications, such as calcium and aluminum salts, cause serious side-effects including constipation, hypercalcemia (an elevated level of calcium in the blood), and neurologic disorders.

A GENTLE ALTERNATIVE 

But hope is in sight for sufferers of chronic renal disease. Scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology IZI in Rostock teamed up with FIM Biotech GmbH to develop an effective therapeutic agent that patients can tolerate well. Formed by marine deposits of volcanic ash 60 billion years ago, clay minerals found in the Friedland area of north-east Germany provide the basis for the new agent. 

The clay first has to be processed before being refined using a special technical process. In a series of laboratory trials and cell culture experiments, the cooperation partners were able to prove the high phosphate-binding capacity and tolerance rate of the clay minerals. 

“The phosphate binder obtained from pure mineralogical raw materials is just as effective as traditional pharmaceutical binders. It can lower renal patients’ elevated phosphate levels. Our tests using animal models show that, unlike standard medications, our binder causes only mild side-effects,” says Steffen Mitzner, head of the Working Group on Extracorporeal Immunomodulation in Rostock and Professor of Nephrology at the city’s university.

The scientists believe that their refined natural raw material could also be used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Another animal model trial is currently underway to determine the scope of using clay minerals to help heal artificially induced bowel inflammation.














(७  )  साइंसदानों को प्याज  में एक ऐसा पेप्टाइड मिला  है जो केल्शियम ज़ज्बी को आसान बनाता है। ऑस्टिओपोरोसिस (अस्थिक्षय ) से ग्रस्त लोगों को  फायदा पहुंचाता है। 




( ८  )क्या आपके चेहरे पे कील मुंहासे यकायक 

बढ़ने लगें हैं ?यह आपके अतिशय दवाबग्रस्त (निरंतर स्ट्रेस में रहने) का 

नतीज़ा हो सकता है। 

( ९  )नींद को भी विच्छिन्न  कर सकता है धूम्रपान 

A new study suggests that smoking disrupts the circadian clock function in both the lungs and and the brain ,meaning it ruins productive sleep ,leading to cognitive dysfunction ,mood disorders ,depression and anxiety. 

(१० )यदि किसी खाद्य के प्रत्येक १०० ग्राम में १२० मिलीग्राम से कम नमक है  तो उसे low salt कहा जाएगा ,लेकिन सौ ग्राम खादय में यदि ५०० मिलीग्राम या उससे भी ज्यादा नमक है तब उसे हाई साल्ट कहा जाएगा। 

(११   ) वे धावक जो दौड़ लगाने से पहले वार्म अप एक्सरसाइज़ करते हैं दौड़ते वक्त ५ % कम केलोरी बर्न करते हैं बरक्स उन धावकों के जो ऐसा नहीं करते हैं। 

(१२  )यदि आप चाहते हैं कि आप जो कार्बोहाइड्रेट्स  से सने खाद्य खाते हैं वे चर्बी में तब्दील न हों तब इन खादयों का बहुलांश आप नास्ते में ही ले लीजिये लंच ,टिफिन ,डिनर आदि में इनकी मात्रा कमतर करते जाइये। ऐसा करने पर कार्बोहाइड्रेट्स को ठिकाने लगाने में दिन भर का वक्त मिलेगा।  


 If you’re looking for a way to stop the carbs you’re eating from turning into fat, try this small diet change: Eat most of your carbs early in the day and reduce them as the day goes on. Try to end your day with more protein. This will better your chance of burning off carbs during your day so they don’t transform into fat.


(१३  ) Slow Eating Might Help Curb Calories


 As people look for fresh strategies to cut back on calories and shed pounds, a new study suggests that simply eating more slowly can significantly reduce how much people eat in a single sitting.

The study involved a small group of both normal-weight and obese or overweight participants. All were given an opportunity to eat a meal under relaxed, slow-speed conditions, and then in a time-constrained, fast-speed environment.
The catch: Although all participants consumed less when eating slowly and all said they felt less hungry after eating a slow meal compared to a fast meal, only people who were considered normal weight actually reduced their calorie intake significantly when eating more slowly.
“One possible reason [for the calorie drop seen] may be that slower eating allows people to better sense their feelings of hunger and fullness,” said study author Meena Shah, a professor in the department of kinesiology at Texas Christian University, in Fort Worth.
Slow eating also seemed to increase water intake and stomach swelling, Shah said, while also affecting the biological process that determines how much food people consume.
The study was published online Jan. 2 in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.
Although just less than 15 percent of Americans were obese in the early 1970s, that figure increased to nearly 36 percent by 2010, the researchers said.
To explore a potential connection between slow eating and reduced caloric intake, the team focused on 35 normal-weight men and women and 35 overweight or obese men and women.
During a two-day study period, all were asked to consume the exact same meals under two conditions. The “slow” meal was spread over an average of 22 minutes per meal, involving small bites and deliberate chewing without concern for time. The “fast” meal involved large bites and quick chewing, under the notion that time was of the essence. The average fast-meal time was about nine minutes.
The result: Normal-weight participants were found to consume 88 fewer calories when eating slowly, a decrease deemed “significant.” By contrast, the obese/overweight group saw only a 58-calorie reduction during the slow-eating session, which was not considered significant.
The researchers said the obese/overweight group actually consumed less food overall during both the slow- and fast-eating sessions than the normal-weight group. That finding might explain the smaller calorie drop during the first group’s slow-eating trial, they said.

Some self-consciousness among the participants might also have affected eating patterns, leading them to consume food in a manner that differed from a private, real-world setting. “There is always the possibility that people will eat differently when they are being observed,” Shah said.
Both groups ate less when eating slowly, however, and a notable spike in water intake during the slow-eating test might be a major reason why. When eating slowly, water intake increased by 27 percent among the normal-weight group, and by 33 percent among the overweight/obese group.
Susan Roberts, a senior scientist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, suggested that the study suffers from a number of analytic flaws.
“First of all, slow eating reduces [calorie] intake by 10 percent in the normal-weight folk and 8 percent in the obese ones,” said Roberts, who works at the nutrition research center at Tufts University in Medford, Mass. “The 10 percent is [deemed] statistically significant, whereas the 8 percent is not. However, there is no significant difference between 8 percent and 10 percent, meaning … there is no difference in the effect of eating speed on [calorie] intake according to whether you are obese or lean.”
“More importantly,” she added, “the obese individuals in the study substantially under-ate during the measurements, which calls into question whether the results are meaningful and repeatable.”
Lona Sandon, assistant professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, said the study did not control for a number of factors that could have influenced the findings. That makes it impossible to conclude that there is any direct cause and effect between slower eating and lower food consumption, she said.
“However, there are other theories and camps of research that support the theory that we consume less when we eat more slowly,” said Sandon, a registered dietitian. “Taking time to enjoy and be more mindful of the food we are eating is associated with eating less.”

“[But] it may be a better strategy for preventing weight gain, as opposed to treating overweight and obesity,” Sandon said.

2 टिप्‍पणियां:

  1. बहुत अच्छी जानकारी...बहुत बढ़िया प्रस्तुति...आप को मेरी ओर से नववर्ष की हार्दिक शुभकामनाएं...

    नयी पोस्ट@एक प्यार भरा नग़मा:-कुछ हमसे सुनो कुछ हमसे कहो

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  2. बहुत सुन्दर प्रस्तुति...!
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    आपकी इस प्रविष्टि् की चर्चा कल बुधवार (08-01-2014) को "दिल का पैगाम " (चर्चा मंच:अंक 1486) पर भी होगी!
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