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बस आपको मुझे मेरे ई-मेल roopchandrashastri@gmail.com पर एक मेल करना होगा। मैं आपको “आपका ब्लॉग” पर लेखक के रूप में आमन्त्रित कर दूँगा। आप मेल स्वीकार कीजिए और अपनी अकविता, संस्मरण, मुक्तक, छन्दबद्धरचना, गीत, ग़ज़ल, शालीनचित्र, यात्रासंस्मरण आदि प्रकाशित कीजिए।


समर्थक

शुक्रवार, 21 मार्च 2014

कबीरा आप ठगाइये और न ठगिये कोय , आप ठगे सुख उपजै ,और ठगे दुःख होय।

बाप को चेतावनी प्रसारित करता है। जिसका शक था वह सही साबित हुआ है। झूठ बोलना बच्चे की

ईमानदारी

को असरग्रस्त करता है। आगे चलके ऐसा बच्चा ठग भी बन सकता है।

यह कहना है लेज़ली कार्वर का। आप केलिफोर्निया विश्वविद्यालय ,सां डिएगो कैम्पस से सम्बद्ध हैं

कबीर दास न बहुत पहले ही कहा था -

कबीरा आप ठगाइये और न ठगिये कोय  ,

आप ठगे सुख उपजै ,और ठगे दुःख होय।

Lying to kids may make them liars – Study


Indeed, children do follow their parents’ footsteps. While a positive path and right learning is always acknowledged and admired, a wrong doing also gets the same following.
A new study has found that children learn the habit of cheating and lying from their parents.

According to the new findings, children who are lied-to by their parents are more likely to cheat and lie themselves.
“As far as we know, this is the first experiment confirming what we might have suspected: Lying by an adult affects a child’s honesty,” study’s lead researcher, Leslie Carver, associate professor at the University of California, San Diego Division of Social Sciences, noted.
The Experiment
For the purpose of the study, researchers at the University of California enrolled 186 children between ages 3 to 7.
Although all children were invited to a room to play a game, half were lied to by the experimenter saying that there is ‘a huge bowl of candy in the next room’.
In the room children were asked to identify character toys by their sounds.
While all sound and character toys were easy to pair, one sound was distorted and did not pair with any character toy.
At this point the experimenter was deliberately called out of the room for 30 seconds. Before leaving the room he explicitly instructed the children not to peek at the mysterious toy.
On returning, the experimenter asked the children if they peeked.
The responses were matched with the video clippings.

Children who were lied to initially were both more likely to cheat and then fib about having done so, researchers said.
Researchers feel that the children were simply imitating the behavior modeled by the adult. “Perhaps the children did not feel the need to uphold their commitment to tell the truth to someone who they perceived as a liar,” Carver said.
The findings of the study are reported in the journal Developmental Science.


Lying to kids may make them liars – Study Lying to kids may make them liars – Study


  1. Health Newsline ‎- 6 hours ago
    Lying to kids may make them liars – Study Lying to kids maymake ... children who are lied-to by their parents are more likely tocheat and lie ...





Lied-to children more likely to cheat, lie


A new experiment is the first to show a connection between adult dishonesty and children’s behavior, with kids who have been lied to more likely to cheat and then to lie to cover up the transgression. Research has documented that the majority of parents admit to lying to their children even as they maintain that honesty is an important value. "The actions of parents suggest that they do not believe that the lies they tell their children will impact the child's own honesty. The current study casts doubt on that belief," the authors say. The study has implications not only for parenting but also for teaching scenarios and for forensic situations, said Carver: "All sorts of grown-ups may have to re-examine what they say to kids. Even a 'little white lie' might have consequences."

Children were asked to identify well-known character toys they couldn't see by their associated sounds.
Credit: Courtesy Carver and Hays, UC San Diego


People lie -- we know this. People lie to kids -- we know this, too. But what happens next? Do children who've been lied to lie more themselves?

Surprisingly, the question had not been asked experimentally until Chelsea Hays, then an undergraduate student in psychology at the University of California, San Diego, approached professor Leslie Carver with it. Now the pair have a paper out in Developmental Science, suggesting that adult dishonesty does make a difference, and not in a good way.

"As far as we know," said Carver, associate professor of psychology and human development in the UC San Diego Division of Social Sciences. "This is the first experiment confirming what we might have suspected: Lying by an adult affects a child's honesty."
The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7 in a temptation-resistance paradigm. Approximately half of the children were lied to by an experimenter, who said there was "a huge bowl of candy in the next room" but quickly confessed this was just a ruse to get the child to come play a game. The others were simply invited to play, with no mention of candy.
The game asked children to identify character toys they couldn't see by their sounds. Sounds and toys were pretty easy to pair: a "Tickle me" audio clip for Elmo; "I love cookies" for Cookie Monster; and "There is a rumbly in my tummy" for Winnie the Pooh. One sound was a deliberately tricky exception: Beethoven's "Fur Elise," which is not associated with any commercially available character toy.
When the classical music cue was played, the experimenter was called out of the room to, supposedly, take a phone call -- leaving the children alone in the room for 90 seconds and tempting them to take a peek at the mysterious toy making that sound. The children were explicitly asked not to peek. On returning, the experimenter also explicitly asked the children to tell the truth. Cameras rolled the whole time.
And? The 5-, 6- and 7-year-olds who had been lied to were both more likely to cheat and then more likely to lie about having done so, too.
About 60 percent of the school-aged children who had not been lied to by the experimenter peeked at the tricky temptation toy -- and about 60 percent of the peekers lied about it later. Among those that had been lied to, those figures rose to nearly 80 percent peeking and nearly 90 percent of the peekers lying.
"Why?" remains an open research question, Carver and Hays note in their paper. It could be the 5- to 7-year-old children were simply imitating the behavior modeled by the adult, or it could be they were making judgments about the importance of honesty to this adult. Or, it could be more nuanced: "Perhaps," they write, "the children did not feel the need to uphold their commitment to tell the truth to someone who they perceived as a liar."

feel the need to uphold their commitment to tell the truth to someone who they perceived as a liar."
But it didn't seem to make any difference to the younger set, the preschoolers, whether they had been deceived by the experimenter earlier. They peeked and lied at about the same rates. That may be because 3- and 4-year-olds don't have very sophisticated theory-of-mind abilities yet.
The study was not designed to get at the reasons that children are more likely to lie when they have been lied to, but to demonstrate that the phenomenon can occur, Carver said.
What happens when trusted care-givers do the lying also remains an open research question. But Carver and Hays are still urging restraint. Even if it's expedient for an adult to lie -- to get cooperation through deception, for example, or to get children to control their emotions -- it's probably a bad idea in the long run.
Earlier research, Carver and Hays note in the paper, has documented that the majority of parents admit to lying to their children even as they maintain that honesty is an important value.
"The actions of parents," Carver and Hays write, "suggest that they do not believe that the lies they tell their children will impact the child's own honesty. The current study casts doubt on that belief."
The study has implications not only for parenting but also for teaching scenarios and for forensic situations, said Carver: "All sorts of grown-ups may have to re-examine what they say to kids. Even a 'little white lie' might have consequences."

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